Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference on Parkinson’s Disease & Movement Disorders Chicago, USA.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Rajendra D Badgaiyan

University of Richmond, USA

Keynote: Novel neuroimaging technique to study Parkinson’s disease
Conference Series Parkinsons 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Rajendra D Badgaiyan photo
Biography:

Rajendra D. Badgaiyan, MD, is a psychiatrist and cognitive neuroscientist. He is Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Richmond University Medical Center, and Professor of Psychiatry at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. He received formal training in psychiatry, psychology, cognitive neuroscience, molecular imaging and neuroimaging. He was awarded the prestigious BK Anand National Research Prize in India and Solomon Award of Harvard Medical School. His research is focused on the study of neural and neurochemical mechanisms that control human brain functions. He developed the single scan dynamic molecular imaging technique (SDMIT) to detect, map, and measure neurotransmitters released acutely in the human brain during task performance. This technique is now used in laboratories all over the world. Using this technique, he studies dopaminergic control of human cognition and behavior. He is also interested in learning the nature of dysregulated dopamine neurotransmission in psychiatric and neuropsychiatric conditions. His research is funded by NIMH, NINDS, VA, and various foundations. Previously he served in the faculty of Harvard Medical School, SUNY Buffalo and University of Minnesota. He has published extensively in peer-reviewed journals.

Abstract:

Diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease is mostly clinical. As a result, it is difficult to make an accurate diagnosis at an early stage. Because of the subjective nature of clinical diagnosis, many patients are misdiagnosed at an early stage. Because of this, treatment gets delayed and the disease progression cannot be slowed down. It is therefore important to have a diagnostic technique that helps us make an early diagnosis. A new imaging technique that we recently developed could be useful. The technique called single scan dynamic molecular imaging technique (SDMIT) uses positron emission tomography (PET) to detect, map and measure dopamine released acutely during a cognitive or behavioral processing. It exploits the competition between dopamine and its receptor ligand for occupancy of the same receptor site. In this technique after patients are positioned in the PET camera, a radio-labeled dopamine ligand is injected intravenously and the PET data acquisition started. These data are used by a receptor kinetic model to detect, map and measure dopamine released dynamically in different brain areas. The patients were asked to perform a behavioral or cognitive task while in the scanner and the amount of dopamine released in different brain areas measured. By comparing this data with data acquired previously in age-matched healthy volunteers during performance of a similar task, it is possible to determine whether dopamine neurotransmission is dysregulated in the patients and whether the dysregulation is responsible for clinical symptoms. Finding of a significant dysregulation in dopamine neurotransmission would confirm diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease. Since this technique measures dopamine released under conditions of cognitive and behavioral stress, it can detect changes at a very early stage, when dysregulation of dopamine neurotransmission is not expressed at rest but manifests under conditions of cognitive/behavioral overload. 

Conference Series Parkinsons 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker John M Baumann photo
Biography:

John Baumann graduated from Cornell Law School in 1986 and, in 2002, at 41 years old, he was diagnosed with Parkinson’s. John worked as an Attorney until 2012 and, from 2004 to 2012, taught at the University of Louisville. In 2008, he reinvented himself into a inspiring success speaker. He has inspired audiences in France, Malaysia, and across the United States and Canada. His book is entitled, Decide Success–You Ain’t Dead Yet. He also collaberated on a book with Deepak Chopra.

Abstract:

Most people are not prepared to do what they need to do when they are told that they have a progressive, degenerative, incurable chronic disease (for example, Parkinson’s). Doctors should take on a meaningful role in the discussion of not just all possible medical ramifications, but also non-medical issues. These include encouraging patients to locate and obtain information from a Parkinson’s support center in your area. Discuss with your support center how to tell your family (one of the emotional heartbreaking things you will ever do). If you are still working, ask your support center if they have the names of employment lawyers that have experience with Parkinson’s. Discuss what rights you now have and which ones you think you might have, but don’t. You should discuss if, when, and how you will inform your employer. Ask the local center if they have a list of benefits lawyers. Realize that you are experiencing a shock to your system and you may not be able to make decisions as well as you did before. This is a hard one to accept. You may need to run your decisions by someone you trust before taking action. Meet with your, or find a, financial advisor. You will need to plan ahead so that you don’t run out of money after you are unable to work in your profession. This should be balanced with enjoying the limited number of years that you will have to ability to do the things that you always wanted to do: travel, etc. Parkinson’s may have an effect on your ability to multi-task and your short-term memory. Maybe turn some responsibilities over to your trusted care partner or financial advisor. Recognize that, although Parkinson’s is a progressive, degenerative disease, eating a healthy diet and extensive exercise appears, in some individuals, to slow the manifestations of the disease. So, get a plan together, maybe with the assistance of your local support center, nutritionist and fitness trainer to improve your lifestyle and stick to it. Finally, it is time to deal with the feelings that you repressed in order to get through the practical issues. You will need a good therapist. Again, contacting your local support center for a list of doctors familiar with PD is a great start.

Conference Series Parkinsons 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Tyrone Genade photo
Biography:

Tyrone Genade completed his PhD and Post-doctoral studies at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, in the Department of Human Biology. His research subject is neurodegeneration and aging of the short-lived Nothobranchius killifish. He currently teaches Anatomy, Physiology and Zoology at Northwestern College (Orange City, Iowa). He is Executive Editor of Killi-Data News: A quaterly review of killifish research

Abstract:

Nothobranchius furzeri is a fish with an average lifespan of 9 to 12 weeks and which is proving useful in aging research. In aging it demonstrates both pronounced neurodegeneration and several motor deficits. Analyses of brain protein extracts show an age-related accumulation of soluble alpha-synuclein oligomer in the brains of the fish. There is evidence that soluble alpha-synuclein oligomers are neurotoxic and cause dopaminergic neuron loss in Parkinson’s disease. Histological analysis with the SNL-4 antibody has demonstrated alpha-synucleinopathy in several Nothobranchius brain regions; notably the olfactory bulb and brain stem. Furthermore, supplementing the fish's food with NT-020 extended lifespan and reduced the soluble alpha-synuclein oligomer burden. The authors also hypothesize that the observed neurodegeneration may in part be attributed to several amino acid substitutions in the PARK7 gene (coding for DJ-1); one of which is at the clinically relevant 172 lysine residue.

  • Managing life with Parkinsons Disease | Novel Insights and Therapeutics for Parkinsons Disease
Location: Chicago, USA
Speaker

Chair

Jayakumar Rajadas

Stanford University, USA

Session Introduction

Jianfeng Lu

Tongji University, China

Title: Reprogramming and programming of human hindbrain cells
Speaker
Biography:

Jianfeng Lu is a professor working in Tongji University, Shanghai, China. He has been working in the field of pluripotent stem cells and neuroscience for more than 12 years. By modulating signaling pathways, he and his colleagues are now able to efficiently convert human pluripotent stem cells into different subtypes of neural cells, which offer very useful tools for modeling diseases, for screening drugs and for cell therapy.

Abstract:

Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are derived from somatic cells, such as skin fibroblasts, which keep the whole set of disease genome and could mimic the genetic environment. Without high efficiency of motor neuron differentiation from human iPSCs, it is hard to model motor neuron diseases in a dish using human iPSCs. By the development of a method for efficient conversion human iPSCs into motor neurons, we have successfully modeled motor neuron diseases, such as spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in vitro. This will help us understand motor neuron diseases deeply and help the development of effective treatment for the diseases.

Speaker
Biography:

Viktorija Piscalkiene is cuurently working in Kaunas University of Applied Sciences, Lithuania.  From 1993–2005 she worked in the Hospital of Lithuanian University of Health Sciences (LSMU) Kaunas klinikos. Her areas of scientific interests are psychosocial aspects in nursing, research of healthy ageing, evaluation of educational environment, educational evaluation of children with ADHD and opportunities for complex aid.

Abstract:

Introduction: Motoric, psychical, emotional and sensory disorders determine the quality of life of people with Parkinson’s disease. They burden daily life activities and influence interpersonal relationship, and increase the risk of injuries. The studies reveal that enabling or in other words the encouragement of people’s abilities, motivation, learning, self-assessment and provision with target knowledge is extremely significant for persons with Parkinson’ disease. It is of great importance that they would believe that they are able, have some skills and they are worth some resources, necessary for their physical and social functioning.

Aim: To improve life quality of the people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) under physical and psychosocial approach. Project target group–people with PD (N=60). The interdisciplinary team that consisted of 30 lecturers and some tens of students-volunteers worked in the following project activities. Project duration-10 months (2016-2017). During the project there were delivered 1) interactive seminars under underlying issues for the people with PD and their relatives 2) there were organized camps of self-expression and healthy movement, devoted to the people with PD 3) there were conducted visits to the people, distinguishing by limited movement at their home, during which there were applied integral methods of nursing and rehabilitation.

Methodology: Applying a partially structured interview, it was sought to find out what benefits for life quality were gained through the participation in the project for the people with PD. The research was grounded on the thematic analysis. 

Findings: All the people with PD, participating in the project highlighted their positive experience and positive impact on their life quality. The following experiences were reflected under cognitive approach–when people with PD, gained target knowledge in terms of self-care possibilities, being ill with this disease. Under physical approach, life quality improved due to the participation in different forums of physical activity. The researched paid the greatest value to the psychological changes, when they learnt to cognize themselves, trust themselves and assess themselves positively; to set new aims for themselves and implement them. Under social approach, positive benefit was gained through the mutual activities with students, lecturers, deeper cognition of old and new people with PD and participation in mutual integral social activities.

Conclusion & Significance: Interdisciplinary approach and application of integral techniques is very significant for the decrease of physical disorders of the people with Parkinson’s disease and it aids at the improvement of emotional condition and social integration.

Speaker
Biography:

Tesla Yudhistira is eagerly studying for his PhD in the Department of Chemistry at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) under the supervision of Prof. David G Churchill. He has obtained a bachelor’s degree in Chemistry from the University of Indonesia. While pursuing science as an undergraduate, he worked in the bio electrochemistry laboratory as a student Researcher.

Abstract:

The chemical etiology of Parkinson’s disease, among other neurodegenerative diseases, is multifactorial and relates to proteins, biomolecules, as well as small soluble analytes including metal ions and ROS. The over-abundance of ROS/RNS could be an indication of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease (PD). Recent articles by us and other researchers have begun connecting the dots of this small molecule chemistry. There is incredible interest in preparing next-generation (e.g. ROS) probes that are reversible, sensitive, and also robust. Concentrations and the innate chemistry of selenium connect to proposed/tentative etiology of Parkinson’s disease. For all of these reasons and more, we feel that the pursuit of studying organo-selenium chemistry in the context of PD will be fruitful in years to come. In this oral presentation and discussion, selenium, a key element in the redox chemistry of life and for its ability to engage in catalysis, is presented and debated in terms of diagnosis (probing) as well as potentially in therapy. To-date, the role of fluorescence and fluorescent molecules in diagnosis, treatment, as well as in biomedical research, has great current medicinal significance; this is the focus of concentrated effort across the scientific research spectrum. In particular, organo-selenium and/or organo-sulfur molecules show great promise in the detection of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS)-key factors in ageing/neurodegenerative disease in living systems. The boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) system is a versatile class of fluorescent dye; it is commonly used in labeling, chemosensing, light-harvesting, and solar cell applications due to the many compelling characteristics, including an intense absorption profile, a sharp fluorescence emission spectrum, and high fluorescence quantum yield. As part of our ongoing effort to study chalcogenide systems, dithiomaleimide- and phenyl selenide probes (among many others) have been designed, synthesized and characterized. Commonly, fluorescence is quenched by photoinduced electron transfer (PeT) mechanism. These probes show a turn-on fluorescence response upon reaction with ONOO- (BDP-NGM) and HOCl (Mes-BOD-SePh) with significant increase in emission intensity with fast response to ROS/RNS. Live cell imaging showed that the current probes can be used for the selective detection of ROS and RNS in living systems. Time- permitting, we also like to briefly showcase other recent related fluorescent probes and studies.

Speaker
Biography:

John M Baumann inspires and helps real people to live their lives to the fullest, and even embrace their life-changing event, with the goal of uncovering their life’s purpose (JohnBaumann.com). He is an internationally-recognized inspiring success speaker. In 2002, at 41 years old, working as the top attorney for a public company, John was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. From 2005 until 2014, John taught law at the College of Business at the University of Louisville to over 1,000 undergraduates. John was selected the Most Inspiring Professor. John wrote a book entitled, “Decide Success - You Dead Yet. John earned his Juris Doctorate degree from Cornell Law School after graduating Summa Cum Laude with a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration from the University of Massachusetts, School of Management. As an attorney, Mr. Baumann has passed the bar and practiced law in Texas, Louisiana and New Jersey before becoming General Counsel of a NASDAQ listed corporation headquartered in Kentucky.

Abstract:

My target audience is all medical personnel. The purpose of this presentation is to encourage medical personnel who treat those diagnosed with a life-changing condition to go beyond the clinical role and provide a more broad perspective on the effects of the illness. Here is what I wished I knew 15 years ago, when I was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, what I know now, and 15 years later

  • Special Session by: Kohji Fukunaga
Location: Chicago, USA
Speaker
Biography:

Kohji Fukunaga first discovered calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) from brain in 1982. He received his PhD degrees from Kumamoto University School of Medicine in 1985. During 1988 to 1990, he worked as Research Fellow in Vanderbilt University (HHMI) under Professor TR Soderling. In 2002, he was appointed a Professor and Chairman in the faculty of graduate school of pharmaceutical sciences. He was Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Pharmacological Sciences (Elsevier) since 2012. He is interested in disease-modifying drug development for neurodegenerative disorders and psychiatry diseases such as autism and mental retardation. 

Abstract:

Backgrounds: Accumulation and aggregation of alpha-synuclein in dopaminergic neurons is one of pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD), and its formation is partly regulated by long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) such as arachidonic acid (AA). Fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3, H-FABP) is critical for AA transport and metabolism in the brain. We recently demonstrated that FABP3 is highly expressed in dopaminergic neurons, especially in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). However, the pathophysiological relevance of FABP3 in PD remains unclear.

Methods: Wild and FABP3 KO mice were treated with 1-methyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropiridine (MPTP) and investigated its neurotoxicity in the SNpc.

Results: FABP3 KO mice were resistant to MPTP-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration and motor deficits. Importatly, MPTP-induced alpha-synuclein accumulation in SNpc was attenuated in FABP3 KO mice compared with that in wild-type mice. In addition, we found that FABP3 overexpression promoted AA-induced alpha-synuclein oligomerization and induced cell death in PC12 cells. Over expression of FABP3 mutant protein lacking fatty-acid binding region did not promote AA-induced alpha-synuclein oligomerization and cell death. Finally, novel FABP3 ligands ameliorated MPTP-induced alpha-synuclein accumulation/aggregation and rescued dopamine neurons from degeneration in MPTP-treated mice.

Conclusion: Taken together, the formation of oligomers of alpha-synuclein is partly regulated by FABP3 through AA binding and metabolism in dopaminergic neurons, contributing to dopaminergic neuronal death seen in PD. We developed FABP ligands to develop as disease-modifying drugs for synucleinopathies in PD.